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Home Heavenly messages 2011 THE LAST WAR?
THE LAST WAR?
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ultima_guerraTHE LAST WAR?

TAKE NOTE OF OUR REITERATED WARNINGS!
WE TOLD YOU SEVERAL TIMES THAT DECEPTION IS WORSE THAN TREASON.
THE MANY WARS IN YOUR WORLD, INCLUDING THE LATEST JUST BEGUN IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AGAINST LIBYA, ARE DUE TO REASONS CLEARLY CONTRARY TO THOSE DISCLOSED TO THE PUBLIC OPINION BY THE POWERFUL ONES. THEY ARE NOT WARS TO FREE AND CONCILIATE, BUT CONQUERING AND OPPRESSION WARS.
THE BLOODY DICTATORS, AS MUAMMAR GADDAFI, WERE ARMED BY THE PRESENT ATTACKERS, THEY HAVE BEEN SUPPORTED BY THE SAME NATIONS THAT NOW  ARE ATTACKING HIM.
THIS IS THE TRUTH.
THE APOCALYPSE HAS STARTED, THIS IS THE TRUTH TOO.
EXPECT, FROM NOW ON, THE IMMINENT RETURN OF THE ONE WHO SAID:
“I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.” (Jn 14:18)
“And then shall they see the Son of man coming in the clouds with great power and glory” (Mark 13:26).
PEACE!

FROM HEAVEN TO EARTH

Sant'Elpidio a Mare (Italy)
20th March 2011. 12:38 p.m.
Giorgio Bongiovanni
Stigmatist

TRIPOLI BLAST AS COALITION ACTION GOES ON

The Pentagon expects to hand over control of allied military operations in Libya "in a matter of days", either to a UK-France coalition or to Nato, US Defence Secretary Robert Gates says.

Meanwhile, witnesses in Tripoli reported hearing loud blasts and anti-aircraft fire on Sunday night.
Smoke rose from near the compound of Libyan leader Col Muammar Gaddafi.
The UK said it again launched Tomahawk missiles as part of a co-ordinated strike on Libyan air defences.
Earlier, the Pentagon said Libya's air defences were effectively degraded.

While the US will continue to play a part in military operations against Col Gaddafi's forces, Mr Gates says it "will not have the pre-eminent role".
"I think there is a sensitivity on the part of the Arab League to being seen to be operating under a Nato umbrella," Mr Gates said. "And so the question is if there is a way we can work out Nato's command and control machinery without it being a Nato mission and without a Nato flag, and so on."
Mr Gates also said a break-up of Libya would be a formula for instability. The east of the country, where the month-old revolt began, has historically been much more opposed to Col Gaddafi's rule, while the west and the area around Tripoli constitute his heartland.

Plume of smoke
A BBC reporter in Tripoli says a heavy barrage of anti-aircraft fire was heard in the city centre on Sunday night.
A column of smoke rose in the area of Bab al-Aziziya, where Col Gaddafi has his military base and compound, our reporter says.
However, he adds that it is believed there are anti-aircraft weapons close to Bab al-Aziziya, which may well have been targeted, rather than the compound itself.
Meanwhile, heavy gunfire and sporadic explosions were heard in the streets of the rebel stronghold of Benghazi on Sunday night, a witness told Reuters.
There were also unconfirmed reports of pro-Gaddafi fighters opening fire from cars in the city.
In a statement from the Pentagon on Sunday, US Vice Adm William Gortney said coalition raids were "judged to have been very effective" and no new Libyan air activity had been reported.
"Benghazi is not completely safe from attack but it is certainly under less threat than it was yesterday," he said.
Meanwhile, the build-up of forces to enforce the no-fly zone continues.
Qatar is to send four planes to join the coalition enforcing the UN-mandated no-fly zone, the US and France have said.
The move would make Qatar the first Arab country to play an active part in the campaign against Col Gaddafi, who has been battling a month-long revolt.
Other Arab countries are also preparing to join the campaign against Col Gaddafi, Vice Adm Gortley said, adding that those governments would make their own announcements in due course.
The French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle has left the Mediterranean port of Toulon for Libya, while Denmark and Norway are each sending six planes. Spain has sent at least three planes, plus a refuelling aircraft, while Italy also has jets ready to deploy.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12801812


LIBYA: RAF 'COMFORTABLE' WITH OUTCOME OF AIRSTRIKES

The UK Ministry of Defence has said it is "entirely comfortable" with the outcome of the airstrikes on Libya.

RAF Tornados carried out a bombing mission, while a British submarine fired Tomahawk missiles.
Several Tornados took off from RAF Marham in Norfolk on Sunday, while Typhoon jets are on stand-by in Italy.
France, the US, Canada and Italy have also joined the UN-backed operation to protect civilians from attacks by Col Gaddafi's forces.
French jets launched a second day of operations over Libya but their planes did not open fire because they met no resistance.
In the last few hours, several explosions have been heard around Tripoli, and witnesses have reported seeing a column of smoke in the area of Col Gaddafi's military base and compound.

'Successful'
The Chief of Defence Staff's strategic communications officer Maj Gen John Lorimer said: "I can confirm that a number of Typhoon aircraft have landed safely at the Gioia Dell Colle airbase in southern Italy, where they are on standby for future tasking."
He added that RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus continued to support the operation with a number of assets, including E-3D Sentry, Sentinel and VC10 planes.
Hercules aircraft also left RAF Coningsby in Lincolnshire, believed to be heading to the Mediterranean with equipment and supplies.
On Sunday evening, the government held its first meeting of a new National Security Council sub-committee on Libya.
A Downing Street spokesperson said the government was monitoring the situation closely after the latest announcement of a ceasefire in Libya.
Saturday's operation, which targeted an "integrated air defence system" in Libya, was the longest range bombing mission carried out by the RAF since the 1982 Falklands War.
The UK launched Tomahawk missiles from a Trafalgar class Royal Navy submarine, which were aimed at targets around the coastal cities of Tripoli and Misrata.
At least 124 missiles were fired by the US and UK, and they hit 20 of 22 targets causing "various levels of damage", the US military said on Sunday.
Defence Secretary Liam Fox said early indications suggested the operation was "very successful".
There would be further air strikes, "if necessary", with the aim of "paralysing" the regime's ability to attack its people, he said.
Asked how long the campaign would take, he said he hoped it would be over as "quickly as possible".
But he added: "That is dependent on how quickly Gaddafi recognises that the game is up."
The RAF Tornados flew from Norfolk and concentrated on targets around the Libyan capital Tripoli.
Speaking after a briefing at the MoD, Air Vice Marshal Phil Osborn said the bombing mission had been "fairly complex".
He said the Storm Shadow weapons used by the jets on their eight hours' round trip had attacked targets with an accuracy of between one to two metres.
Captain Karl Evans, Chief of Naval Staff, said the submarine which fired Tomahawk cruise missiles during last night's mission was still in position to attack Libya, while two Royal Navy ships were taking part in a naval blockade.

'Just cause'
Libyan state TV reported that what it called the "crusader enemy" had bombed civilian areas of Tripoli, as well as fuel storage tanks supplying the western city of Misrata.
A Libyan government spokesman described the coalition attacks as "aggression without excuse" and claimed many civilians had been hurt.
Prime Minister David Cameron said it was a "just cause" and in "Britain's best interests".
"We have all seen the appalling brutality meted out by Col Gaddafi against his own people," he said.
Labour leader Ed Miliband said the international community "could not have stood by as innocent people were slaughtered".
Meanwhile protesters from the Stop The War Coalition held a protest outside Downing Street on Sunday.
The organisation has condemned the military action, saying it would not stop the civil war and was a "prelude to a wider war with substantial loss of civilian lives".
A British journalist was being held by Libyan authorities in the capital Tripoli, Arab television station Al Jazeera revealed on Saturday night.
Cameraman Kamel Atalua was detained with a fellow cameraman and two correspondents, after the team had been reporting from Libya for several days.
The military action follows the passing of a UN resolution imposing a ban on all flights in Libyan airspace, excluding aid flights, and authorises member states to "take all necessary measures" to "protect civilians and civilian populated areas under threat of attack".

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12799493

After a rolling start, with French aircraft firing the first shots, this operation to enforce UN Security Council Resolution 1973 is unfolding in a familiar way.

The initial aim was to degrade and destroy Libya's integrated air defence system, largely centred in the western part of the country around Tripoli.
Land attack cruise missiles were fired from US warships and submarines out in the Mediterranean.
A British Trafalgar class submarine was involved as well.
So too were Royal Air Force Tornado GR4 fast jets.

They flew the round trip from their base in Britain to launch Storm Shadow missiles against Libyan air defences. Storm Shadow is a long-range stand-off missile that can be launched well out of range of enemy air defences.
US B-2 Stealth Bombers were also employed, dropping some 40 bombs on a Libyan airfield.
All this has put the conditions in place for the establishment of the no-fly zone.
Indeed, in Washington, the top US military commander, Admiral Mike Mullen, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has announced that the no-fly zone is now in place, though there may still be additional work to be done.

Civilian protection
But the dismantling of Libyan air defences also affords coalition aircraft greater freedom for their other missions - because the most urgent task demanded by the UN Security Council resolution is to protect civilians from attack by Libyan government forces.
The strikes by French jets on Libyan tanks on Saturday, outside Benghazi, were just a taster. Reports suggest that more extensive strikes against Col Gaddafi's troops have been taking place since.
This comes after reports of continuing offensive operations by Libyan government forces, especially around Misrata.
Having breached the UN Security Council resolution, Col Gaddafi's armed forces, or at least the most potent elements of them - his tanks and heavy artillery - now appear to be the main focus of attack.
His goal seems to be to get his advance elements into the rebel-held cities as fast as possible to make the targeting of these forces more difficult from the air.
That will create some problems for coalition planners, given the emphasis upon avoiding civilian casualties. But these forces - especially outside Benghazi - are at the end of long supply lines and very vulnerable to attack.

'Regime change'
We know how this operation started. One can predict how it is likely to unfold over the next few days. But how will it end? Put the question a different way: we know the tactical goals, but what is the overall strategic purpose?

UN Security Council Resolution 1973 sets out a clear aim: a ceasefire and an end to attacks by pro-Gaddafi forces on civilians and population centres.
It does not explicitly call for regime change as such, though it gives broad military latitude in terms of operations to protect civilians.
In this light, some might argue that Col Gaddafi and his generals, who sit at the top of the Libyan military command chain, might potentially be considered as targets.
But that is not necessarily a view that everyone in the coalition would agree with.

Political question
How far are the coalition forces willing to go? They will have carefully drafted rules of engagement but the question is really political and not military.
One possible outcome is the defeat of Col Gaddafi's forces and their withdrawal from rebel-held cities, leading to a kind of uneasy stalemate.
In the shadow of coalition air power, Col Gaddafi would not be able to mount offensive operations of his own. But the rebels would not have the capacity to challenge his hold on much of the western part of the country.
This would not be an attractive outcome for Washington, London or Paris. In each of these capitals, leaders have insisted that Col Gaddafi must go.
"Libyans must be able to choose their own destiny," as French President Nicolas Sarkozy put it.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12799620 

 

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